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Tag: graphics

14
Feb

5 Reasons Not to Date a Graphic Designer

It’s Valentine’s Day and love is all around! Maybe you’re thinking about asking out a designer you’ve had your eye on for a while now? Because everybody loves designers, right? But, before it’s too late, it might be worthwhile to read this article.

Here is a list of why you should not be dating a graphic designer.

 

1. They Are Strange

Graphic designers tend to be complicated both in thinking and acting. They prefer to analyze the texture and pattern on the cafe table better than having to hear you talk. They remember more about the release date of the latest Adobe Photoshop instead of your birthday.

2. They Have Different Definitions About “Dating”

For them, dating means two things: “Brainstorming” and “Client Meeting”. It sounds predictable and both are very boring! And worse they will analyze your chats by layer.

3. They Don’t Have Much Time

I mean they do not have much time for anything other than graphic design. They will leave their desktop just because of two things: sleepy or hungry. Even, if they successfully taken out, they will most likely bring a notebook and pencil to doodle. And in the end you will feel as though you are doing everything by yourself.

4. Big Spender!

Of course, it’s not just any shopping, but all the super geek stuff. Like maybe a graphic tablet, which one-day would you use to chop onions? They prefer to spend the money to buy a font rather than buy you a birthday present. Oh God, what a geek!

5. They Love to Criticize

Graphic designers often criticized about everything, and. um. You will most likely be forced to agree and come to criticize. Everything that contains visual elements will be criticized, from a menu design in a cafe, billboard designs, logos found on the street, up to the color combinations the clothes you wear. You’ll also get some lectures about “color psychology”.

So you still want to date a Graphic Designer?

21
Jan

10 Times Designers Should Just Say “No”

Design resource website Pixelo shares 10 frequent situations where designers should learn to say no to the clients. Sometimes it can be deleterious to say yes to unreasonable request – like working for free in exchange for exposure.  Check them out below.

 

01. “Can you do something similar to that designer’s work?”

NO! Hire that designer if you like his style.

 

02. “I made this in Word, can you start from here?”

NO! Finish it yourself, designing in Word means you have some talent.

 

03. “Can you work for free?”

NO! I have bills to pay.

 

04. “I suddenly have another idea, can we change the whole design?”

NO! Unless you want to pay double.

 

05. “We don’t have any content yet, can you just design a daft?”

NO! Do you think I’m kind of soothsayer or something?

 

06.  “It’s urgent, can you do it really quick?”

NO! My brain doesn’t have a time-lapse feature.

 

07. “My wife like Pink, can you change the color?”

NO! Pink has nothing to do with “Go Green” campaign.

 

08. “We are in a tight budget, but you’ll gt a lot of exposure!”

NO! I have enough exposure on my camera.

 

09. “Can you lower your rate?”

NO! I have bills to pay, remember?

 

10. “Can you just take the logo from our website?”

NO! It less than 200px and we’ew going to make a billboard ad.

Have more to add to this list? Write it in the comments below and share this post with other designers.

28
Dec

5 New Year Resolutions for Freelance Graphic Designers

The New Year is slowly nearing. Well, now’s your chance to sit down and ponder over your design career and decide about what you want to change.

What follows is a list of 5 important resolutions for every Freelance Graphic Designer.

 

1. Work Smart

You need to bring in efficient communication and analytical skills as well as a good understanding of handling projects when it comes to building a career. Don’t sell yourself short and don’t work too hard for the wrong type of client.

 

2. Aim Higher

Take on new, diversified challenges that will give you an experience and will build an impressive portfolio. You may be an excellent logo designer, but don’t limit yourself to just being a logo designer. Take on website designing or graphic designing. Get out of your comfort zone, learn new things and become well-rounded.

 

3. Stay Focused

Unless you give proper attention to each project, you will not create good designs. Remember, graphic designing is all about creativity and creativity comes best when you focus on one particular project rather than scattered on multiple projects.

 

4. Be Organized

Make sure you save the following: All records of conversations with a client, first drafts, images, templates and PSD layers. Be sure to organize each in respective folders. Many designers admit that staying organized has helped them save a lot of time, making their work a bit easier.

 

5. Have fun

See some friends, read a book, watch a TV series on Netflix or just take a walk every day. Not only will this refresh your mind, but will also boost to you creativity. You can also go to the gym, if you like. with a good half an hour spent on physical activity, you will feel energized and energetic about working on tough projects.

So, start today and be committed to making a creative change in your life!

 

 

10
Dec

Why Graphic Designers Hate Christmas

It doesn’t matter if you work in a company or if you are a freelance creative, December always means one thing for graphic designers: Christmas Graphics.

I think all the designers starting to freak out when they hear these words because all the clients want the perfect image, and we all know what that means. Snowflakes, Christmas Trees, Reindeers, Wrapping Paper and Ribbons everywhere. It’s not Halloween anymore but It still scares.  I think that us creatives we would prefer to be hibernated from the end of November to the beginnig of new year. And you? Do you like Christmas Graphics?

Sorry, I have to go…
I must put, with Photoshop, a Snowman on a tropical beach (please, kill me!)

19
Nov

Bali for Art & Design lovers

Finally, after a long season full of projects, I decided to take some time off and go to Bali for two weeks. But the island is not just a surfer’s paradise or endless shopping opportunities.

Bali is a veritable playground for art and design enthusiasts. Here’s why I chose this destination!

The Balinese create art wherever and whenever possible. That means art galleries, traditional art products, and an overall artistic vibe throughout the island. So many people on the island are involved in artistic pursuits, as dancers, traditional instrument players, painters, craftspeople, designers, and more. Here, may guide to exploring Balinese craftsmanship and its history.

 01

Painting, Ubud

Agung Rai Museum of Art and Neka Art Museum show fine examples of local painting as well as work from nearby village Batuan, famous for producing dark, densely patterned depictions of everyday life. To bring a piece of artistry home, there’s the Ubud Art Market, which, in addition to the area’s typical tourist wares (basket handbags, sarongs), also offers a veritable and well-priced selection of handcrafted trinkets.

 02

Woodcarving, Mas

Just south of Ubud, Mas dazzles visitors with its fine wooden sculptures. One can catch master carvers in action by visiting long-standing studio-galleries like Adil Artshop and Njana Tilem Gallery, which also offer exquisite works for sale.

 03

Silver- and Gold-smithing, Celu

In Bali, precious metalsmithing is synonymous with the town of Celuk, whose main street is lined with several large jewelry outlets like Prapen, where it’s possible to watch smithing in action before perusing what seems like an endless supply of handcrafted baubles and bits.

 04

Traditional Dance, Uluwatu

For the Balinese people dance is an integral part of religious and artistic expression. There are many different types of Balinese dances. If you are heading to the Pura Luhur Uluwatu Temple, you’ll get to check out the Kecak Dance in the amphitheater. You won’t forget this experience in a hurry – it’s quite a spectacle!

22
Oct

7 things you should never say to a graphic designer – But probably do

Creating the perfect campaign for your business can be tough, which is why it’s so important to have a great designer in your corner. Of course, I know that sometimes graphic designers can be hard to communicate with.

They have their design jargon and special software — and you might have no idea what it all means or how it all works. So if you work with designers, this guide will help you to ask the right kind of questions that will move your project along and create a final product that everyone will be happy with.

What might those be? Check out these 7 questions that designers wish they didn’t hear.

 

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01. “Can I get you to do something really quick?”

Are you sure it will be quick? Do you know what’s involved? Your designer is more than likely happy to accommodate an extra task or an adjustment here and there, but will definitely appreciate your consideration in asking how much time it will take. Designers are good at giving estimates and will let you know how much time they need if you ask.

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02. “Can you use this image I found online?”

Turning to Google or other search engines for images can backfire in a number of ways. For one, you could run into legal trouble for using a copyrighted image. Additionally, it’s likely that the image won’t even look good in your design because the resolution is too low. If you’re looking for an alternative to paying for stock photos, there is an increasing number of sources where you can find quality, free stock photos.

03

03. “Can you have this done by tomorrow?”

Graphic design isn’t an instant process that is done with a few clicks of a mouse. Every project will have its own process and time requirements. Realistically, some designs can be whipped out in a day, while others will take much, much longer. It completely depends on the project. If you’ve found a designer you’d like to hire, let him or her know about your time constraints and ask for a realistic estimate on how long the design will take.

04

04. “I know someone who works for half that. Could you lower your rate to match?”

Designers set their prices based on multiple components: geography, cost of living, style, skill, experience, and many more. Every designer will have a different combination of strengths and abilities to offer, and there’s no special formula for determining if a designer’s rate is competitive or “fair.” Generally you get what you pay for — so you need to decide what characteristics are most valuable to you in a designer (speed? quality? originality? reputation? personality?). That’s not to say price negotiation is not an option, but if your first encounter with a designer is an effort to “lowball” his rate — suggesting a rate much lower than normal, while expecting the same quality of work — that will be an immediate turnoff and feel disrespectful to the designer.

 05

05. “How much would my [special, complicated project] cost?”

The answer isn’t as simple as you might think, and will be different for every project. It depends on a lot of things. That’s because pricing a project is not a black-and-white process. Most designers will want to have a detailed discussion about your project before giving you a quote. Factors like how complex it is, how fast you’ll need it, what types of formats or deliverables you’ll want, where and how it will be printed and/or published, and many others all play a part in determining pricing. When you first approach a designer, offer your project details before asking about costs, and you’ll get a more thoughtful, accurate estimate.

 06

06.  “Can I call or email you anytime?”

Nobody — even freelancers or night-owls — monitors their work email or phone 24/7. Designers have schedules, too (even if they work from home in their pajamas) and often collaborate with multiple clients simultaneously. You may not be able to get a hold of your designer at a moment’s notice, but you should hear back from him during his working hours. If you’re concerned about how easy it will be keep it touch, make sure to ask when those working hours are (and limit your most important messages to that time) as well what his preferred method of communication is.

 07

07. “You’re the expert here. Can’t you just do your creative magic?”

Well… we are not magician. Designers are experts at creating beautiful, functional designs from the guidance and parameters you provide. Designers can put all their creative energies into creating an interesting, effective design, but only you know what you want, so it’s ultimately up to you to communicate that.